Erwin Wurm (*1954)
Instruction Drawing (1 Minute, 8 am), 1998, felt pen on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm, courtesy: private collection, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), Instruction Drawing (Make your own F.E.Walther), felt pen on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm, courtesy: private collection, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm, One Minute Eternities, when Everything is Possible

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), Instruction Drawing (Airing your Trousers, Hands up), 2014, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014,

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

 

Städel Museum
Schaumainkai 63
+ 49 69 6050980
Frankfurt am Main
Erwin Wurm: One Minute Sculptures
May 7-July 13, 2014

Doing press-ups on coffee cups, balancing on oranges, flying on a broom, everything is possible — for one minute. Städel Museum presents Erwin Wurm: One Minute Sculptures. In this context, Austrian artist Erwin Wurm (*1954) is placing works from his series One Minute Sculptures — older ones as well as some developed especially for the Städel collection — in the Städel Garden, the Metzler Hall, and the Old Masters and Modern Art exhibition galleries. These interactive works call upon viewers to do more than merely look at museum artworks surrounding them, but to experience the artworks and themselves in new ways. In the form of drawings or brief written directions, the visitor is instructed and encouraged to become an artwork — a One Minute Sculpture — for the duration of sixty seconds. Erwin Wurm has been producing the works in this series since 1997, and documenting them photographically and on video. In addition to the living sculptures with which the visitors become a temporary part of the Städel collection, some twenty selected photographs and films from this series is on view in the Metzler Foyer.

The exhibition is being realized with support from the Städel Gartengesellschaft.

“Erwin Wurm’s multifaceted works are a constant source of inspiration and shifts in perspective. I am extremely delighted to have this opportunity to show one of the most influential work series by this outstanding Austrian artist — his world-famous and widely cited One Minute Sculptures — at the Städel, and thus to offer our visitors a means of becoming protagonists of an artwork themselves for the duration of a single minute, which proves not to be quite as short as it sounds”, says Städel director Max Hollein.

“Wurm’s One Minute Sculptures possess an element of humour and playfulness, but that is by no means their raison d'être. On the contrary, the grotesque instructions for action are frequently comments on traumatic, frightening everyday experiences. And indeed, the ‘everyday’, with its abysmal surreality, is the theme and motivation of Erwin Wurm’s works”, is how Martin Engler, Head of the Städel’s Contemporary Art Collection and curator of the exhibition, describes what he considers to be the fundamental aspect of the One Minute Sculptures.

Born in Bruck an der Mur, Austria in 1954, Erwin Wurm is one of the most successful contemporary artists of his generation. For more than two decades he has been scrutinizing our traditional concept of sculpture from different angles. From his early minimalist clothing sculptures (which he began producing in the late 1980s) and the immaterial/ephemeral One Minute Sculptures to the grotesquely distorted or bloated objects such as Fat Car (2000/2001) or Fat House (2003), Wurm has consistently concentrated on expanding our conception of what a sculpture can be when it is no longer cast in bronze or chiseled in marble. His oeuvre is represented in such world-renowned collections as that of the Guggenheim Museum in New York or the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and in the past years has moreover been featured in major solo exhibitions all over the world.

Visitors will be greeted by the first One Minute Sculpture right at the main entrance to the Städel Museum, where they will be invited to pose on a pedestal on all fours. He or she who follows these instructions will become a dog waiting in front of the museum, and thus a quotation of an early work by the Austrian action artist Valie Export (*1940) in which she “walked” Peter Weibel, as a “dog”, through the city centre of Vienna in traditional Viennese Actionist manner. As they tour the Städel collection with works dating from seven hundred years of art, the visitors will come across other pedestals, chairs, etc., complete with instructions for action, here and there by chance. Erwin Wurm will place his prompts in the Old Masters collection, for example, in front of Netherlandish paintings and Italian art of the Late Middle Ages, or in front of Impressionists works and next to Expressionist sculptures in the collection of Modern Art. Finally, in the Metzler Hall, surrounded by Thomas Demand’s room installation Hall (2011), the One Minute Sculptures will encounter contemporary art. From there the view opens onto the Städel Garden, where — crouching, hopping, finger in nose, standing on one leg as One Minute Sculptures — visitors can follow further instructions by Erwin Wurm.

Even if sixty seconds appear quite brief for the lifespan of a sculpture in the classical sense, it proves to be quite a challenge for a living body to remain in a single pose for that length of time. The process of becoming aware of one’s own body and its possibilities and limitations, and the control of the same, are important aspects of Erwin Wurm’s work. By actively involving the visitor — who, as a One Minute Sculpture, is a living artwork and model, a performer and artist’s assistant as well as artist’s material all at the same time —, Wurm questions not only the traditional concept of sculpture but also the interfaces between performance art and everyday life, the role of the beholder and the boundaries of contemporary art. Once the sixty seconds are over, nothing will remain of the temporary sculpture but a memory; at the same time, photographs and videos on view in the Metzler Foyer of the Städel Museum will point to the beginnings of Erwin Wurm’s One Minute Sculptures in 1997.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), One Minute Sculptures, 1997, c-print, 45 x 30 cm, courtesy: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; FRAC Limousin, Limoges, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm (*1954), Instruction Drawing (Cutlery), 1998, felt pen on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm, courtesy: private collection, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

Erwin Wurm, (*1954), Erwin Wurm, Performance Grammaire Wittgensteinienne de la culture physique at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris / Pantin, March 2013, © Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac / Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014

 

Erwin Wurm (*1954)
Instruction Drawing (Sigmund Freud modern), 2005, felt pen on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm, courtesy: private collection, © Studio Wurm / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014.

 

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Hermann) 3, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Manifesting the Human Body in the 21st Century

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Franz) 5, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

 

Albertina
Albertinaplatz 1
+ 43-1-53483-0
Vienna
Erwin Wurm
De Profundis

December 12, 2012-February 17, 2013

Austrian artist Erwin Wurm (b. 1954, Bruck an der Mur) has successfully established himself on the international art scene for several years now, such as with his One Minute Sculptures (stagings of mostly bizarre situations that have been captured in photographs) and his defamiliarizations of objects (such as Fat Car).

In the focus of the artist’s first one-man show at the Albertina is a new group of works that is currently in the process of completion. In it, Erwin Wurm deals with the human body in a cross-media approach by confronting the real manifestation of the body in the 21st century with the body language of Gothic art, which results from the spirit of internalization and asceticism.

The exhibition presents around 100 works, including 30 drawings and 70, sometimes large, as well as reworked photographs. Wurm is currently one of Austria's most successful artists.

Wurm has always concentrated on extending the traditional concept of sculpture.

Erwin Wurm is known for his uniquely humorous approach to formalism, Wurm’s multi-disciplinary works have appeared in exhibitions throughout the world. Erwin Wurm has exhibited extensively with shows such as, Glue Your Brain at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia, (2005); Erwin Wurm at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, France, (2007); Spit in Someone’s Soup at the Konstmuseum Malmö, Sweden, (2008); The Artist Who Swallowed the World at the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Switzerland, (2008); the Moscow Biennial (2009); Narrow Mist at Ullens Center of Contemporary Art, Beijing, China (2010); Liquid Reality at Kunstmuseum Bonn (2010); and The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture 1839 to today at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2010). Recent solo exhibitions have been held by the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, Florida (2012); Dallas Contemporary, Dallas, Texas (2012); and Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool, UK (2012). The artist has a solo exhibition at Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany later this year and a large public installation outside Standard Hotel, New York.

Works by Wurm are included in prestigious collections throughout the world at the Guggenheim Museum, New York; Peggy Guggenhein Collection, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland; Musèe d`Art Contemporain de Lyon, Lyon, France; and Centre Pompidou, Paris, France, among others. Erwin Wurm lives and works in Vienna, Austria.

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Christian) 1, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Manfred) 2, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Michael) 5, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

 

Erwin Wurm, Ohne Titel (Cajetan) 7, 2012, © Erwin Wurm/Albertina, Wien. VBK, Wien 2012.

Erwin Wurm, Big Gulp Lying, 2010, aluminum, paint, 82 x 200 x 120 cm, edition of 3, Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York.

Erwin Wurm, Psycho 7, 2010, Aluminium, paint, 120 x 39 x 107 cm.

Erwin Wurm Positing Sculpture as an Act of Changing Mass and Volume

Erwin Wurm, Gherkin, 2009, bronze, paint, cloth, 48.5 x 24.9 x 19 cm, edition of 6, Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York.

Erwin Wurm, Me on LSD, 2010, polyester, concrete, paint, metal, 165 x 90 x 75 cm.

Erwin Wurm, Kastenmann, 2010, Aluminium, paint, 172 x 43 x 36 cm.

 

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac
7 Rue DeBelleyme
+ 331 4272 9900
Paris
Erwin Wurm. Yes Biological
January 11-February 12, 2011

During the 1990s, Erwin Wurm attracted much attention with his One-Minute Sculptures. Following the artist's instructions, visitors to the exhibition could themselves briefly become sculptures, by taking up often absurd poses frequently involving everyday objects.

Wurm has always concentrated on extending the traditional concept of sculpture, starting from the classic pre-modern premise that sculpture is concerned with the alteration of mass and volume. He takes this premise literally, and applies it to everyday reality: "To change mass and volume is a sculptural act. To gain or lose weight is also a sculptural act.” Thus people can themselves become sculptures.

In the early 1990s, Wurm made a video entitled 59 Positions, now in the collections of the Museum Ludwig, Cologne, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris. It shows people taking up specific and unusual positions using a pullover, according to his instructions, then freezing as One-Minute Sculptures. Here the performative is combined with the sculptural. In the present exhibition, the works thus created are represented as monumental sculptures or as groups of sculptures on a greatly reduced scale.

The small sculptures seem to huddle together, to twist themselves round to face outwards. The large sculptures, because of their monumentality, are more static, but they, too, seem to be in a state of dissolution. Here Wurm takes the performative element of the One-Minute Sculptures to a new level of monumentality, nevertheless retaining their processual aspect. The definition of inside and outside is blurred in these works; they can be seen as both inward- and outward-facing. They look compact and self-contained; we can put ourselves in their place, but we cannot empathise with them.

Erwin Wurm's sculptures are often defined by their shell, the outline that circumscribes their volume. This may be a suit, or a pullover. Originally, the artist used to pull garments over simple wooden plinths, thus converting them into sculptures. In his latest works, the box shape of the plinth is sometimes still visible. What in the One-Minute Sculptures was a person, later became a plinth, and is now a hybrid form.

The oversized police cap in the exhibition becomes a complete sculpture only when a viewer stands underneath it; the head disappears, so that the cap seems to sit directly on the torso, rendering the person anonymous. This is reminiscent of a child trying on its parents' clothes to assume an adult role, which it cannot fulfil.

Erwin Wurm will install an enormous "knitted wall", which reintroduces a previous work on a smaller scale, titled, like the exhibition, Yes Biological (43 x 85 cm), which also deals with the expanded concepts of sculpture and painting. The exhibition area becomes the canvas, a mural (in the literal sense) is created, and we are uncertain as to whether it should be called a picture or a sculpture.

Erwin Wurm (b 1954) lives and works in Vienna and Limberg. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at the Kunstmuseum, Bonn, Germany (2010), Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, China (2010), Essl Museum, Vienna, Austria, and the Städtischen Galerie im Lenbachhaus and Kunstbau, Munich, Germany. This year, his work is to be presented in solo exhibitions in the Middleheimmuseum Antwerp, Belgium, Kunsthallen Brandts/Brandts Klaedefabrik, Odense, Denmark, Gementemuseum, Den Haag, Netherlands, Institute of Contemporary Art, Sofia, Bulgaria and Museum of Applied Arts, Vienna.

Erwin Wurm’s works feature in many collections of major institutions, including: in France, Centre Pompidou and Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris, Musée d’Art Contemporain, Bordeaux and Musée d’Art Contemporain, Lyon; in the US, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and Judith Rothschild Foundation, New York; in Germany, Museum of Modern Art (MMK), Frankfurt, Center for Art and Media Technology (ZKM), Karlsruhe, Museum Ludwig, Cologne and Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus and Kunstbau, Munich; in Switzerland, Kunsthaus, Zurich; and in Austria, Belvedere, Albertina and Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation (MUMOK), all in Vienna.

Erwin Wurm, Polizeikappe, 2010, 90 x 51 x 105 cm, Styrofoam, epoxy resin, cloth.

Erwin Wurm, Untitled, 2010, Acrylic, paint, 57 x 18 x 11 cm.

Erwin Wurm, Dog that swallowed a letterbox, 2006 and Fat House, 2005, Iron Wood, Polystyrene, 5 x 10 x 7 m; 8' 40'', loop.

Erwin Wurm, Ich, Uber – Ich, 2008, Sculpture, Styrofoam, acrylic, 125 x 120 x 60 cm, Edition 5.

Erwin Wurm, Re-envisioned Tradition in Light of Re-envisioned Reality

Erwin Wurm, Hypnosis, 2007, Sculpture, Styrofoam, acrylic, 100 x 117 x 55 cm, Ed. of 7.

Erwin Wurm, House Attack, Installation, Museum für Moderner Kunst, Vienna, 2006.

 

Galerie Nicola von Senger
Limmatstrasse 275
+ 41 44 201 88 10
Zürich
Erwin Wurm
April 8-June 7, 2008

By REMI JACCARD

Concurrent to the exhibition at the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Gallery Nicola von Senger is pleased to present new works by Erwin Wurm. Born in 1954 and trained as a sculptor, Wurm has already produced an impressive and successful artistic oeuvre placing him among the ranks of the most important contemporary artists internationally. Through his continuous experimentation with objects, photos, performance, drawings and video Wurm stretches and reshapes the contemporary understanding of sculpture while remaining true to his origin. His examinations of form, time, volume and virtuality are grounded within the traditional definitions of sculpture.

Wurm takes a skeptical approach to tradition and presents us with new interpretations and multifaceted analyses of the essence of everyday objects and their appearance. His prevailing interest is the ordinary — anything can be transformed into art — and it is this concept which serves as the basis for the main themes in his work, namely, investigations and observations of the condition humaine or man’s fate.

His work is influenced by an unconventional understanding of reality and therefore often seems surrealistic even though it is firmly planted in the here and now. Potatoes suddenly grow legs, people blow up or animals swallow strange things — the unexpected relationship with everyday objects leads his sculpture to subtly threaten and unsettle our normality. It is just this synthesis that makes his works so readily understood as they both disturb and attract the viewer. With Leaning Car (working titel) Wurm’s slanted view of our society drives him to disrupt the steady chain of production in order to fabricate an inclined automobile — a motionless sculpture expressing both unrest and motion. In Mental Brown Wurm triggers extensive questions when he humanises objects by clothing canvases in t-shirts: Does it fit? What’s hidden beneath?

Wurm is able to condense a sequence of events and convey it with reduced objectivity as in his house series. The typical function of a house — to make one feel safe — is pushed ad absurdum through Wurm’s deformed structure. A blown up and melted structure replaces a sprawled landscape; constructions twist and writhe until Bungalow, potato-shaped. covered with a woolen blanket, is transformed into a homey shelter.

The artist doesn’t turn the world upside down, rather he tilts it. The composition of the images in Energy Station leads one to believe that the station is resting on its roof with the ground merely attached to the foundation. With subtle irony and a touch of sarcastic wit, Erwin Wurm scrutinizes the commonly accepted notions defining our world and imposes upon them his own personal perceptions provoking us to marvel, to laugh and to think. Ultimately, his tongue-in-cheek artworks laughingly help us come to grips with life.

— February 2008,
Translation: Elaine Keller

 

Erwin Wurm, Ich, Uber – Ich, 2008, Sculpture, Styrofoam, acrylic, 125 x 120 x 60 cm, Edition 5Erwin Wurm, Energiestation, 2008, C-print, framed, 120 x 150 cm, Ruckseitig signiert und datiert, Ed. of 5.

Erwin Wurm, Truck, 2005

Erwin Wurm, One-Minute Sculptures, Shadows of Freud and Spinoza

Erwin Wurm, Freud's rectification (Philosophy-digestion), 2004.

Erwin Wurm, The artist who swallowed the world, 2006.

 

Kunstmuseum St.Gallen
Museumstrasse 32
St.Gallen
+ 41.71.242 06 71
Switzerland
Erwin Wurm,
The artist who swallowed the world

March 1-May 12, 2008

‹Was heisst es, Künstler zu sein? Kunst zu machen.›

— Erwin Wurm

Sexy und trendy. Er gehört heute zweifellos zu den erfolgreichsten Gegenwartskünstlern. Kaum ein Tag vergeht, an dem nicht eines seiner Motive – natürlich unautorisiert – in den Medien verwendet würde. Erwin Wurm hat die Skulptur neu erfunden und ihren Bezug zum Menschen neu definiert. Mit viel Humor wird der zeitgenössische Betrachter einbezogen, ja, er wird selbst zur Skulptur, wenn er den Handlungsanweisungen des Künstlers folgt. Es ist kein Zufall, dass eines der bekanntesten Musikvideos, Can’t Stop der Red Hot Chili Peppers, ‹inspired by the ‚One minute sculptures’ of Erwin Wurm› das Lebensgefühl offensichtlich punktgenau trifft. Keep a cool head, 2003, schlägt der Künstler vor und lässt den Kopf durch eine runde Öffnung in den Kühlschrank stecken oder mit Büroutensilien verzieren, wie in der One minute sculpture, 1997. Niederknien und an Freud – Wittgenstein denken, 2003, wird angewiesen, wenn die Rückenlehnen zweier gekippter Polsterstühle zur unkonventionellen Benutzung einladen, oder man soll die Luft anhalten und an Spinoza denken. Es wird rasch klar, dass ein Nachdenken über den Philosophen seine engen physischen Grenzen haben wird, spätestens wenn der Protagonistin auf dem billigen Webteppich sprichwörtlich die Puste ausgeht.

‹Jede Zeit hat ihre eigene Wahrheit. Künstler und Philosophen sind auf der Suche danach, und beide scheitern ständig daran.›

— Erwin Wurm

Erwin Wurm, 1954 im österreichischen Bruck an der Mur geboren, hat in den letzten 25 Jahren ein vielschichtiges Werk geschaffen, in dem sich ein auf das Sein des Menschen ausgerichteter Skulpturbegriff in verschiedene Richtungen erweitert. Vieles kann zur Skulptur werden: Handlungen, geschriebene oder gezeichnete Anweisungen oder selbst ein Gedanke. Die kleinen Unzulänglichkeiten des Alltags, seine urkomischen Situationen — wenn man sie denn sehen will — ebenso wie elementare Lebensbedürfnisse können zu Kunstwerken gerinnen. Erwin Wurm thematisiert Schlankheitswahn und Fettsucht, Mode, Werbung und Konsumkult und nimmt zentrale Fetische der Warenwelt wie das idyllische Eigenheim oder das flotte Auto ins Visier.

Die umfassende Ausstellung im Kunstmuseum St.Gallen reicht von frühen minimalistischen Werken wie den Staubarbeiten und den ersten Objektskulpturen bis zu den jüngsten, traditionell bildhauerisch gearbeiteten Plastiken und Installationen. Im Zentrum der Präsentation stehen fotografische Arbeiten und raumgreifende Installationen wie Adorno was wrong with his ideas about art, 2005, und spektakuläre Skulpturen wie UFO, 2006, The Artist who swallowed the world, 2006, und Mind Bubbles, 2007.

‹Ich wollte Malerei studieren und wurde durch Zufall Bildhauer. So begann ich darüber nachzudenken, was Skulptur heute sein könnte. Dies brachte mich zu Fragen nach Leere, Virtualität, Volumen, … die grundlegenden Qualitäten von Skulptur.›

— Erwin Wurm

Die Ausstellung entstand in enger Kooperation mit dem MUMOK – Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig in Wien, dem Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst in Aachen, den Deichtorhallen in Hamburg und dem Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon.

Zur Ausstellung ist im Cantz Verlag ein umfassendes Katalogbuch erschienen, CHF 64.–

Erwin Wurm, Adorno was wrong with his ideas about art, 2005.

Erwin Wurm, Hypnosis, 2008, Edition of 15, Aluminium, 18kg, 78 x 89 x 40 cm.

Erwin Wurm, Reconsiderations of the Notion of Sculpture

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac
Mirabellplatz 2
Salzburg
+ 43-662-881-393
Erwin Wurm, Hypnosis (Editions)
January 26-March 8, 2008

Hypnosis was developed exclusively for Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, and 15 copies of it will appear. The exhibition will take place in the Department of Editions at the Salzburg gallery. Hypnosis is a sculpture cast in aluminium, the body of which resembles a potato. That potato-shaped body is given a high polish, whereas the legs are matte-finished. The artist regards Hypnosis as a type of thought balloon, but also as a result of his rather long preoccupation with archetypes or various mental conditions, especially hypnosis. In addition to the edition, a number of new works will be shown in the main building of the gallery.

 

For more than 25 years, Wurm has been dealing with the notion of sculpture and the possibilities of expanding it. Especially his One minute sculptures made him known worldwide. Here, the artist tells people what to do-e. g. stick their head into a refrigerator-and takes pictures of them. In doing so, Wurm shows that a sculpture might exist only for a few minutes and that everything can become a one, even the visitors to an exhibition who follow his instructions. Hence, Erwin Wurm's art blurs the borders between sculpture, performance, and action.

Erwin Wurm was born in 1954 in Bruck/Mur and has livied in Vienna for many years. His works are represented in international collections, such asFonds Régional d'Art Contemporain, Galleria d'Arte Moderna Bologna, Walker Art Center, MUMOK (Vienna), and Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt. The first large Wurm retrospective took place at the Museum für Moderne Kunst in Vienna in 2007 and was also shown at other European museums. At the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, the Wurm retrospective contributed to an increase in visitors by twenty-five percent in 2007. Five hundred cultural experts and artists from Germany selected the top cultural highlights of the year 2007. The Erwin Wurm retrospective was rated second-best, even outperforming Documenta 12.

Erwin Wurm, Hypnosis, Installation view, 2008.