Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Óculos. 1968. Industrial rubber, metal, glass. 11 7/16 x 7 1/16 x 2 15/16″ (29 x 18 x 7.5 cm). © Courtesy of World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association. Photo: © 2014 Eduardo Clark.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Clark’s proposition Ping-pong (1966) in use. The objects are Ping-Pong balls and a plastic bag. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Relógio de sol (Sundial). 1960. Aluminum with gold patina. Dimensions variable, approximately 20 7/8 x 23 x 18 1/8” (52.8 x 58.4 x 45.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Rafael Romero. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Wind from South America, Neo-Concretism, the 'Abandonment of Art'

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). The Inside Is the Outside. 1963. Stainless steel. 16 x 17 1/2 x 14 3/4″ (40.6 x 44.5 x 37.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Adriana Cisneros de Griffin. © Courtesy of World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association. Photo: © Thomas Griesel

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Planes in Modulated Surface 4. 1957. Formica and industrial paint on wood. 39 1/4 x 39 1/4″ (99.7 x 99.7 cm).  The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Kathy Fuld  © Courtesy of World of Lygia Clark Cultural Association. Photo: © Thomas Griesel.

Cover of Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988, published by The Museum of Modern Art, 2014.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988) wearing Máscara abismo com tapa-olhos (Abyssal mask with eye-patch, 1968), a work made of fabric, elastic bands, a nylon bag, and a stone. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

 

Museum of Modern Art
11 W 53rd Street
212-708-9400
New York
The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor, and The Werner and Elaine Dannheisser Gallery, fourth floor
Lygia Clark:
The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988

May 10, 2014-August 24, 2014

The Museum of Modern Art’s major retrospective devoted to the art of Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988) is the first comprehensive exhibition in North America of her work. Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988 comprises nearly 300 works, ranging from the late 1940s to the early 1980s, including drawings, paintings, sculptures, and participatory works. Drawn from public and private collections, including MoMA’s own, this survey is organized around three key themes: abstraction, Neo-Concretism, and the “abandonment” of art. Each of these axes anchors a significant concept or a constellation of works that mark a definitive step in Clark’s career. While Clark’s legacy in Brazil is profound, this exhibition draws international attention to her work. By bringing together all parts of her radical production, the exhibition seeks to reinscribe her into current discourses of abstraction, participation, and a therapeutic art practice.

Lygia Clark trained in Rio de Janeiro and Paris from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s and was a leading abstract artist at the forefront of the Neo-Concretist movement in Brazil, fostering the active participation of spectators through her works. From the late 1960s through the 1970s she created a series of unconventional artworks in parallel to a lengthy psychoanalytic therapy, leading her to develop a series of therapeutic propositions grounded in art. Clark has become a major reference for contemporary artists dealing with the limits of conventional forms of art.

Organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, The Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, MoMA; and Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum; with Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães, Curatorial Assistant, and Beatriz Rabelo Olivetti, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, MoMA.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by Ricardo and Susana Steinbruch, The Modern Women’s Fund, Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, Vicky and Joseph Safra Foundation, and the Diane and Bruce Halle Foundation.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988) in her studio, Rio de Janeiro, c. 1950s. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Clark’s proposition Estruturas vivas (Live structures), 1969, in use, probably in Paris in the early 1970s. The object is made out of knotted rubber bands. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988) in her studio working on Arquitetura biológica II (Biologic architecture II). Cité internationale des arts, Paris, 1969. Photo credit: Alécio de Andrade. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Clark’s proposition Diálogo de mãos (Dialogue of hands, 1966), in use probably by Clark and Hélio Oiticica. The object is made of elastic. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Superfície modulada no. 9 (Modulated surface no. 9), 1957. Industrial paint on wood, 13 x 36 5/8” (33 x 93 cm). Collection Andrea and José Olympio. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Trepante, versão 1 (Climber, version 1), 1965. Aluminum. Dimensions variable, overall approximately 103 9/16 x 57 ½” (263 x 146 cm). Jones Bergamin. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920-1988). Relógio de sol (Sundial). 1960. Aluminum with gold patina. Dimensions variable, approximately 20 7/8 x 23 x 18 1/8” (52.8 x 58.4 x 45.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Rafael Romero. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Planos em superfície modulada no. 2, versão 01 (Planes in modulated surface no. 2, version 1). c. 1957. Industrial paint on wood, 31 ½ x 26 3/4″ (80 x 68 cm). Luiz Paulo Montenegro Collection. Photo credit: Eurides Lula Rodrigues Cardoso, Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro.